Category Archives: iPad Accessories

iPad Accessories

JamStik in the Classroom

I am very excited to see where this goes. Definitely a blog to follow…

 

http://paideiamusic.wix.com/online#!jamstik-blog/c17y3

JamStik in Education…and the Campaign Continues!

As I said in a previous post, Zivix has always been focused on education, but they have been expanding their mindset from 1:1 guitar instruction to classroom instruction. The video features the MacPhail Center for Music, which is in the Twin Cities (close to the headquarters of Zivix in Minneapolis).

I only have one complaint about the video: it doesn’t go far enough in expressing how the JamStik can change guitar instruction.

As a music educator with licensure in both vocal and instrumental music, I am not afraid to say that guitar should be a part of every high school music program. That doesn’t mean that band, choir, or orchestra doesn’t have a place in the curriculum–but guitar does. This is a scary statement for a lot of music educators, as they fear losing students to a guitar class, or they fear that they will have to teach the class.

The JamStik is uniquely situated as the perfect guitar for classroom guitar classes. To use the device, you do need an iOS Device (iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch) or a Mac. That said, many schools (even Chromebook schools!) will have a classroom set of iPads or iPod Touches available which can be used with a set of JamStiks.

Once you have a device to link with the JamStik, you have a perfect solution for a guitar class. First, the devices never need tuning. Yes, you eventually need to teach students how to teach a guitar (or do you?). Second, the students are learning with real strings and real frets. Third, the environment is silent, and every student can hear what they are doing, as they would be using headphones to practice their guitar skills. Should you also need to hear what the student is doing, you could use a headphone splitter, or you could look at a solution like the JamHub (no relation to the JamStik) for multiple inputs at one time. Fourth, you can use Zivix’s JamTutor, or you can use other materials, such as GarageBand’s (Mac) guitar lessons, or you can even use a “traditional” guitar book. Fifth, although you need a place to store and charge the devices, the amount of space required is a fraction of what you would need for a set of acoustic guitars (and likely will cost a fraction of the cost of storage units). And last in my list (but not final by any means), the devices are extremely rugged. Our units are showing some scuff marks where you strum the guitar, but are otherwise in perfect condition. One student dropped a JamStik wth the guitar strap in place, and the JamStik landed on the peg that connects the strap to the JamStik. The peg will no longer hold in place on that JamStik, and that is our only mechanical error (and that is because of a student’s mishandling of teh device). Although we bought some extra strings, all of the strings are holding up and show no sign of wear, even though they are being used multiple hours per day.

Another important aspect of “traditional” guitar classes is teaching music literacy, which means reading music on a staff (in addition to reading guitar tablature). When I taught guitar classes, I would always have students who could play guitar and read tabs, but could not read music. Those students actually had to start at the beginning, for a very different reason than other students (learning to read versus learning to play). When they had “down” time, those students would often pull up a tab sheet and play songs from various webpages. The JamStik+ connects via Bluetooth MIDI, meaning that you keep an active internet connection on your device. This means that students will have the ability to access those tab sheets online, as they don’t have to sacrifice their internet connection for the JamStik.

The cost of a guitar and a case for a guitar class is under $200 (make sure to get a guitar with a truss rod…just trust me on that one), and plan extra money for new strings and eventual repairs. Once the campaign is over, I would suggest keeping an eye on Zivix for information on educational pricing, classroom sets, and other solutions. I don’t think Zivix can match “bargain basement” guitar pricing, but I would expect a discount below the $299 MSRP, and the promise of a device that may be more rugged and stand up better over time than a traditional guitar.

In my case, I am not teaching a “traditional” guitar course (specific students in my 8th grade classes are doing an independent study versus singing in choir), but I have taught those courses at the high school level in the past, and I would have loved to have had a JamStik at that time. By the way, every “traditional” guitar class only covers the first 5 frets (or less) of the guitar. There are a few guitar purists who insist that they need more frets (maybe they do), but I would guess that the JamStik’s capo feature would make playing in most keys a possibility.

As an instructor, I bought a Washburn Rover travel guitar so that I could easily navigate a classroom and help students. That guitar was about $120, although they list at $175. How much better would a JamStik have been for those classes…showing fingering using the open play feature on a screen, and walking around the room with even a smaller solution than the Rover.

So again, I have no arguments with the video–I would just love to see an entire guitar classroom, teaching “traditional” guitar classes, outfitted with JamStiks. If you are interested in the JamStik+ for yourself, you can still purchase one at a significant discount through their campaign.

 

Five Years of iPad

It seems that April 3rd is considered the birthday of the iPad. I remember standing in line to buy my first iPad, at the Richfield, MN Best Buy, which is literally in the shadows of Best Buy Headquarters (I had a bad experience with Best Buy last fall, and I have not been in a Best Buy since). If you want to read about my first iPad, you can read this old post.

Since that April date, an iPad has been my main tool at school, thanks to a number of apps including forScore, unrealBook, Notion, and Keynote. In the past five years, I have personally owned four of the six models that have been released…the iPad 1, the iPad 2, the 4th Generation iPad, and just a couple of weeks ago, my iPad Air 2.

So much has happened in the past five years, including wireless mirroring. I remember how excited I was in the fall of 2011 to stream from iPad to a screen without wires. Now there are ten ways to do that!

Many of the technology blogs are celebrating the iPad today, while declaring that “tablets need to take the next step.”

I'm not sure what that next step is. Certainly, a larger iPad (the iPad Pro) would be a welcome addition, and there is always room for improvement in apps (ask any developer, they will quickly admit that they can and will improve their app over time). But as I work on this iPad Air 2, I'm not sure what else the hardware itself can do, and in fact, Apple has packaged more hardware in the last few generations of these devices than the accessory makers can take care of–example? Bluetooth MIDI. The device has been physically capable of this for more than two years, but iOS allowed for it last fall, and there are only a handful of accessories that can take advantage of it.

Sure, a true active stylus, such as the Microsoft Surface, would be a nice addition. That said, I wouldn't want to be tied to any stylus, either. But if you think back to the time where everyone complained about the iPad's lack of a USB Port–the combination of Bluetooth and Cloud computing has taken away much of the need for USB devices (including storage). The greatest flaw in the current iPad line is the existence of the 16GB iPad…no one should ever buy an iPad with only 16GB, and Apple should not be selling that device. Every iOS device should start with 32GB. Period.

By the way, until I can purchase the Zagg Rugged Case for my iPad Air 2, I am using a Finite case that I found on Amazon for $10 (the cost of a replacement screen for the Griffin Survivor cases that we use with our school 4th Generation iPads). My previous case for my iPad, the strange looking but extremely useful Gripcase, is not avaialble for the iPad Air 2. While the Zagg case appeals to me, this Finite case will last for some time.

Five years with the iPad…it is hard to believe it has been that long…but I can't imagine teaching without it. Although I am at a 1:1 where students often take their devices for granted (and some actually complain about the iPads), I wouldn't trade my iPad for any other device in my classroom.

The JamStik+ Campaign Continues

I have talked a lot about my JamStik, and Zivix, the makers of JamStik, is offering a KickStarter campaign to produce their latest JamStik, the JamStik+, which has all the goodness of the original JamStik plus a pick-up and Bluetooth MIDI. I blogged about this the other day, and they are offering discounts off the eventual MSRP of $299. The original JamStik was sold in Apple Stores, and I would guess that this updated device will be, too. The early bird deals are gone, but good discounts remain for the next 36 days.

Zivix was trying to raise $50,000. Their original JamStik camaign on Indiegogo raised $190,000.

Currently, the JamStik+ has over 1,000 backers and has raised over $250,000. Wow. And for each 15 JamStiks sold, 1 will be donated to an educational organization.

I am using JamStiks with some of my alternative students in my middle school program, and kids are interested in the devices. The new JamStik will solve some of the minor issues that we have faced, and the high level of funding should allow Zivix to put some more emphasis on app development–both existing and future apps.

If you want to contribute, or to get a JamStik+ at a discount, join the campaign:

The best part about this campaign? This isn’t a vaporware campaign…the original JamStik is on the market, and you KNOW you will receive your item, on or very close to the proposed timeline.

JamStik+ Kickstarter Campaign Begins Today!

I will begin this post with a simple statement and a link. The JamStik+ began on KickStarter today, and met its goal in just over three hours. The promotion is still underway, and for the first 48 hours, you can buy a JamStik+ for $100 off retail. If you are interested, the link is: http://kck.st/18XReLB. Even if you miss the first 48 hours, you can still “buy in” at a lower cost during the campaign.

Now…for the interesting stuff. The JamStik was created in nearby (for me) Minneapolis, with a combined effort of guitar players and engineers (and some mixture of the two), and was funded, in part, by an earlier Indiegogo campaign (2013, which raised about $180,000). The goal from the start was to create a wireless, portable guitar that could act as both a instructional tool for guitar and as a MIDI controller. It was never meant to be a guitar replacement, and the device, which finally shipped in the fall of 2014, did everything that it said it would do. Along with the device, Zivix (the company behind JamStik) came up with new wireless protocols, developed a wireless MIDI device (Puc), and released three iOS apps, one needed to connect the JamStik (JamStik Connect), one as a instructional “game” (JamTutor), and one mixing app (JamMix).

If you bought a JamStik–via Indiegogo or afterwards–you were likely happy with the purchase. It met every promised characteristics. There were a few hard core guitarists that weren’t happy, but again, they were looking for the JamStik to be a guitar replacement, not a tool for instruction or a MIDI tool for guitarists.

A few music educators saw the JamStik and realized its potential for the classroom. It is safe to say that education has ALWAYS been a part of the JamStik, but the vision has been 1:1 versus a classroom setting. Through a combination of fundraising, some help from my school, and some help from Zivix, we have a set of nine JamStiks that I have been able to use with students this year–and although there have been some challenges, I am excited about the potential of the device. The devices are rugged (withstanding abuse), the batteries last for more than a week of use across various classes, and the software works well. Sure, I have some items on the “wish list,” but the updates to the JamStik firmware have been wonderful (changing a D-Pad function to a capo, for example) and the company continues to develop and refine its apps.

This is the part of the KickStarter that might be missed in the campaign…for every 15 JamStik+ units that are sold, 1 will be donated to education. Take a look:

How great is that? Not only can you purchase a JamStik+ at a discount, you can also be a part of a donation to an educational group (this could mean a school, or another educational setting).

Now that it is 2015, there are only 2 potential setbacks to the original JamStik (from ancient 2014), which of course still works perfectly. The first is that Apple released Bluetooth MIDI in iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite, which changes how you interface with a MIDI device. The JamStik+ is a low energy Bluetooth device, so it can connect to Bluetooth MIDI enabled apps (on iOS or Mac) without any background app (or cables). The original JamStik acted as a wireless router, and truthfully, the connection process (although simple) was the hardest part about using a JamStik (In other words, a pain point, but a very, very small one).

The other limitation of the original JamStik was criticism from “real” guitarists, who wanted the device to be able to handle pull-offs and some other guitar techniques. These are not techniques that we use in guitar classes–so they are not really a limitation for anything we do. Zivix answered that concern by adding a pickup to the JamStik, which will result in even greater accuracy and sensitivity, as well as allow for some advanced guitar techniques.

The addition for Bluetooth MIDI is the big point for me–it’s a game changer in simplicity, not only for the JamStik, but for ANY MIDI device. Yes, a Bluetooth MIDI Guitar controller for $199 (KickStarter 48 hour price) is worth the cost of an upgrade (and any price point is worth the investment, if you play guitar).

Do you play guitar and write your own music? Then you need this device and either Progression or Notion on your iPad. You won’t regret it. If you have been thinking about a JamStik–now is the time to buy one. If you believe in the product, how about sponsiring $5, or buying the JamStik “goodies” pack. Either way…act soon. The campaign lasts 42 more days, and although some offers will end, some discounts will be available until the end of the campaign.

 

 

 

 

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