Old Technology! (Canon P-150 Scanner)

This afternoon, on a Sunday, I wanted to do some school work involving some scanning. I haven’t had to use my small duplex feeding scanner, the Canon P-150, for some time.

Unfortunately, I’m running Mac Catalina on my MacBook Pro. One of the changes with Catalina is that it requires all programs to use 64 bit programming (something iOS has required for a couple of years), meaning that older 32-bit programs simply don’t run.

Some companies are solving this problem by releasing updated versions to users for free (e.g. PDFtoMusicPro), and others are charging for the update (PhotoScore). And other companies are just letting old programs go.

It turns out that my Canon P-150, which has scanned so many songs for me over the years, is now a brick with Mac OS Catalina. And I find myself frustrated by this…and saddened by this. I’m frustrated because the P-150 has been an incredible tool in my music technology repertoire over the years. I’ve had this scanner since 2012 (I had to look up my old posts) and have more than recuperated the $200 cost of that scanner in the time that I have saved by having that device at hand (it is incredibly small and powerful). And sadly, if you aren’t running Catalina, it still works.

On top of that, Canon USA’s website won’t load. That’s depressing. And when I look online, it looks like a lot of Mac users running Catalina are finding that their products have reached the end of their lives, as Canon isn’t planning on updating anything.

I’m sad because this little device has been a constant companion over the years. It is the oldest piece of technology in my “kit,” as I replaced my 2008 MacBook last summer.

I don’t know what I’ll do in regards to a scanner. As I’m not teaching high school choir (or middle school choir), my need to scan choral scores is pretty minimal these days, and when I want to scan a book, I send them to One Dollar Scan (it’s just more effective in terms of time).

Our home printer has a scanner, but it isn’t a duplex scanner with autofeed. And furthermore, I think scanning on it requires a USB connection…and all we do with it is print to it. It’s an Epson Eco-Tank, which I would recommend to anyone needing a home printer with the need to print in color–provided that you don’t need laser color performance. We’ve saved enough in print cartridges to more than cover the cost of the printer.

I remember scanning parts of a high school library with a flatbed scanner…sitting at home, watching my son (now 11) crawl on the floor, while I watched TV and turned pages. It was a tremendous waste of time, but I did what I had to do; and this P-150 was such a time saver. I hate to say “goodbye” to it, but I think that is what is going to have to happen.