Technology That Influenced My Life in 2017-2018: Bluetooth Receivers

I use a lot of recorded audio in my work, which can include anything from playing a Keynote with embedded video files on my MacBook, to playing audio from forScore on my iPad. Switching between audio connections can be a pain–and every moment that your eyes and body are doing something other than teaching is a moment for your students to be off-task as well. There are some classroom transitions that cannot be avoided–but with foresight, many tech transitions can be avoided.

As I mentioned in a previous post, I began using a microphone last year in my teaching. I already had a small mixing board connected to the sound system, so it became very easy to attach Bluetooth receivers (yes, plural) to that sound system.

In the past, I had tried to use AirPlay through Apple TV or even the Apple Airport Express. This worked, but there was always lag in the audio (push play and wait) and there were times that things did not work. In particular, we wanted a way to be able to control our middle school level musical from forScore, with every audio track embedded in the score, but I did not want to deal with wires, and AirPlay had too much of a lag.

Amazon to the rescue…quite literally.

Amazon sells a $20 Bluetooth receiver that can be connected to your receiver or mixing board (you need to buy the appropriate cables…1/8″ stereo to ?? Dual 1/4 mono? RCA? 1/8″ stereo?).

Once your iOS device or Mac (I cannot speak to Android, Chromebook, or Windows in this matter) is in range and the device is on, it automatically connects, and you can instantly play audio over the Bluetooth connection.

This isn’t new technology, but it sure works well.

I ended up buying a second Bluetooth receiver (I went with a different brand so they would look different in my Bluetooth menu on my device) for my MacBook. I could have bought two of the same unit and just experimented until I found out which receiver was which. I do not believe that you can rename units so they look different in your Bluetooth menu.

As a result, I could play audio seamlessly from either device, without wires.

A student COULD go up to your receiver and put it in “pair” mode to play their own music during your class, but they would have to do so physically (there is a button to press). Chances are that isn’t going to happen.

If you play audio files to a sound system in your room from one or more devices, a solid solution is to invest in a $20 Bluetooth receiver. Highly recommend!

Amazon referral link for the Amazon Basic Bluetooth 4.0 Receiver


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