Category Archives: iPad Accessories

iPad Accessories

The Zivix JamStik is Now Shipping

Back in 2013, Kevin Honeycutt (a former art teacher, who is an now educational motivational speaker) tweeted about the JamStik, a guitar controller for iOS (and Mac) that was an Indiegogo campaign. I wrestled with the idea of “buying into” the device, but finally decided to jump on board. The JamStik was being sold at a discount to early backers, and I submitted my $219 to be an early backer to the project.

Well, time passed. The company, located nearby in Minneapolis, Minnesota, took prototypes to various computer and app shows. And I was (and still am) teaching at the middle school level where students are asked to choose between band, choir, and orchestra–meaning that as a choir director I have students who either love singing or cannot play an instrument. This has convinced me that students at the middle school level–even if selected by hand because of their reluctance to sing–should have another option as a performance class–guitar. I understand this is an unpopular stance, but I strongly believe in it. Furthermore, I teach at a 1:1 iPad school, so a guitar controller for iPad makes sense as a way to learn guitar. Small, light, rechargeable, and NO TUNING. Yes, guitarists need to learn how to tune a guitar. But I have never been in a guitar class where all the guitars were in tune (within any individual guitar, or with all the other guitars in the room). Tuning is a skill that can be taught along the way. With this in mind, I saw (and still see) the JamStik as a device with a lot of possibility for education, even at a suggested price point of $299.

The problem was that the JamStik was delayed, then delayed, and then delayed more. Thankfully, the company was busy enough at prodcut shows to demonstrate that it was still in the game. And last month, units to the original 900 backers began.

My JamStik shipped last Friday, and arrived Tuesday night. I have had some time to play with the device, and it is perhaps the first device that I have ever backed that has lived 100% up to its promise (with the exception being the shipping dates along the way). As promised, it is a five fret MIDI guitar controller for iOS or Mac. It is solidly built, and uses real strings with infared sensors. Although it is probably a “toy” for a “real” guitarist, I think “real” guitarists could make real music with it. At the same time, for casual guitar players, like myself (actually, I have a hard time calling myself a guitarist) or for educators teaching (or students learning) guitar, this might be the perfect device in a 1:1 iPad setting.

The device connects to your iOS device (I have used it with both my iPad and iPhone) with a wifi connection, which is broadcast by the JamStik. If you run the JamStik Connect app (free), and JamStik Connect runs in the background on your device, you can use the JamStik with just about any CoreMIDI app on iOS. JamStik Connect broadcasts its own audio (you get a choice of five guitars) out of the iPad, so if you plan to use another app, you have to turn the guitar sound created by JamStik Connect “off.” Otherwise, you get the sound of the other app PLUS the sound of JamStik Connect. This isn't a problem, but it is something that may take a moment to figure out when you hear two guitar sounds out of one app. I do wonder if each JamStik creates its own channel and network name, and I wonder if it is possible to have a room of JamStiks in an educational setting, or if that would be wifi overload. The wifi component surprised me…for some reason I thought it would be a Bluetooth device.

The apps that come with the device seem to be well made…Jamstik Connect works well (no discernable delay) and Jam Tutor is solid. As a music teacher, my only “complaint” about JamTutor is that it doesn't teach guitar from “traditional” notation, which always one of my goals when I teach a guitar class. Think about the power of letting students use JamTutor so they can learn at their own pace, and then supplementing the experience with traditional “guitar” methods including notation and tablature! I have not worked with their sequencing app, JamMix. All the Zivix apps are free on the App Store.

As with all devices, I only see two “negatives” with the JamStik. First, as a MIDI device, you can shift the JamStik up or down an octave or two octaves. You cannot, however, shift MIDI in terms of half steps. I can see the possibility of a basic guitar player wanting to use chords from the key of G, but to transpose the JamStik to another key (such as F or C)…but you can't do this with the JamStik hardware at the current time. You would need some kind of display to show you your transposition, which the JamStik doesn't have. In other words, the JamStik lacks a digital capo. That might be a negative for some owners, but I am not sure if a future firmware update can address this functionality.

Second, the strings, although not actually amplified, are not tuned to the pitches we normally associate with a guitar. As a result, as you pluck the strings, you can hear the “pluck” of the actual pitches, while the MIDI sounds comes through your iOS device. This makes for a small amount of dissonance. I don't know if it is possible to tune the JamStik to the actual pitches (in truth, just being “close” would be enough to solve this issue). Maybe this only bothers me as I am a music teacher.

From what I have gathered, the folks at Zivix have said that the strings are very rugged, although I expect we will see ways to buy replacement strings and batteries soon.

One of the tough things that has happened is that the JamStik is now in some Apple stores while some unknown number of JamStik owners are still waiting for their JamStik from backing the product back in 2013. My guess is that Zivix thought they were going to meet all their deadlines, signed a contract with Apple based on those deadlines, and then had issues with parts (a stock e-mail from Zivix, sent to backers who inquire about their missing backed device, explains the part shortage). I think Zivix was requried to ship product to Apple, not having shipped to all backers first. That is a hard thing to take if you have been waiting more than a year for a device–and additionally Zivix's lack of addressing that situation (to date) is a little awkward. I don't think there is any explanation that can soothe feelings after a year of delays and now the Apple store situation. I personally would always to like to see open communication from a company, but I tend to be more patient and am not the litigating type. I also have my JamStik in my hands at this point.

I filmed a video with the JamStik earlier today; I will post that when I get a chance to edit it, which may not be today.

$299 may seem like a lot of money for this device, but a traditional backpack guitar (I have one of these from my time teaching guitar at the high school…it was just easier to deal with than a full guitar while teaching) costs around $200. For the added benefit of being able to bring MIDI into an iOS Device or Mac via a wireless connection based on infared sensors? $299 seems like a pretty good price, and as with all things, I would expect that advances in the product might eventually lead to additional models (a full size guitar?), features, and lower prices. I would also like to see educational sets of JamStiks and educational pricing. If schools were willing to drop thousands on Yamaha's MIE keyboard labs, why wouldn't you consider 30 iPads and 30 JamStiks ($27,000)? The JamStik is a device that could really change how we teach guitar and also help non-guitarists music educators to include guitar in their course load. I am excited to see where the product goes from here.

 

Broken Devices…

Several months ago, my stepson was finally allowed to have an iPhone from his father's house. His cell phone has always been something that has been provided by his father. About the same time, he gave us his iPod Touch, which had been damaged (something happened to the home button), and didn't want it any more. I had found a vendor at the Minnesota TIES (our education technology conference) that repaired devices, so I sent the device to them in February. They let me know it would take a while to receive the part, but expected the part no later than early March. Unfortunately, things haven't worked out. After my last bad experience with a device repair center, I decided to take the calm route and e-mail montly to the company about the device. Last week I e-mailed for a third time, and the owner e-mailed back, apologized for the delay, and told me it would be fixed this week. I had not heard from them this week, so I e-mailed yesterday and they responded to let me know that they were unable to repair the device and would be sending a replacement unit.

I'm not sure what happened during this process, but we didn't “need” the device, as we have three iPhones, three iPod Touches, one iPad, and an iPad Mini in our family for five people. So unlike my last bad repair expeirence with Fastfixology where my Mother-in-law's iPad was out for repair and needing immediate service, I could afford to wait on this one.

I don't know why they should have to replace a device they couldn't repair, unless the attempted repairs damaged the device further, or the device itself was destroyed or lost. I'll be certain to post an update to this post when I figure it all out.

Ultimately, the iPad Mini seems to be the device both of my younger boys gravitate towards, so we may be replacing all the iPod Touches in our family in the months to come with two iPad Minis (maybe at Christmas). The iPod Touches also get lost in our house all the time, while the Mini stays visible because it is larger. Updating to larger devices will make our lives easier as parents, and also stop the fighting between kids about who gets to use the iPad Mini.

On to a personal item…

Our second and last concert of the year was held on Thurdsay night, and as I unloaded my truck at the high school where we perform, my gear bag dropped out of my hands, and my iPad fell out of the bag. I had not zipped up the bag, so there was going to be damage one way or another.

The end result is that even though my iPad was in its New Trent Grabber case with the cover on, the impact on the face of the device was enough to knock the cover off and allow the screen to take the impact; a diagonal crack all along the device, and a smashed corner. The good news: the grabber case actually protected the corners of the iPad. The iPad worked well enough for me to use in the concert (both music and audio), but as a person who promotes the use of technology in music education–particularly the iPad–I knew that I had to get the screen repaired…and I will be using it during some of our last 12 days of school.

I didn't want to send the iPad to the place that is still repairing our iPod–this was an urgent repair and I needed my device back in my hands. A former student whose daughter is now in my choir told me about a repair shop that is in our general community. So on Friday, during an open hour, I drove to the shop and left my iPad to be repaired, expecting it today (Saturday). Sure enough, I was called today, paid the $149 repair fee (retina screen iPad 4), and the iPad is back. You can feel that it is a replacement screen…there are some rough (not sharp) aspects to the bezel of the iPad case. I'm not mad about that at all–have you seen what they have to do to remove a screen? If not, go look at some YouTube videos on the subject.

So…I'm back in business. Apple's own cost is $299 for the same repair (the same price as a NEW 4th Generation iPad with 16GB of memory…I own the 64GB model and have had it about 1.5 years). $150 seems to be the going rate, and you can buy the panel itself for $90…but I would suggest that you know what you are doing if you are going to try to repair your own iPad; you can quickly cause more than $60 of damage trying to repair your iPad yourself.

The company here in Minnesota that repaired my iPad is GopherMods, and I do not have a speciic referral code for you to use. They do some referrals that require an order number and it will give you 10% off a repair–if you use them and want my order number for that discount, feel free to send me an e-mail. It turns out our local shop was a trial of a satellite location, and it is closing to move to a permanent site in a nearby community. This company started as a college student fixing devices in his spare time at the University of Minnesota (where I earned my doctorate, incidentally)…and also “modded” PlayStations. Thus the name “GopherMods” (Minnesota Golden Gophers…the most fearsome mascot of all time–unlike the Badgers, Wolverines, or Wolfpack). GopherMods also includes a one year warranty on the part (which does not include breaking). They are considering expanding their operation to other states, and do accept walk-in orders.

I am working on that repaired iPad right now as I write this post.

So…I have had a number of experiences with device repairs over the past years, and it seems that the best solution may be to find a local shop that can turn around your device in a short amount of time. You can mail your device somewhere, even for a good deal (my horrible experience was centered around a repair that was at cost for an iPad screen because of the wait time on a previous repair)–but if you can't walk in and talk to someone, you might be pressing your luck for a repair.

As for this iPad, I will be upgrading this fall to the next iPad (either Air or a Pro, if that model is released) and giving this iPad to my Father-In-Law who is still using my 2nd Generation iPad that I bought in October 2011. That was another reason to have the screen replaced. I'm thinking about moving to the Gripcase. We have a Gripcase on our iPad Mini, and it really does a great job of protecting the device from our kids. I'm sure that if my iPad had fallen out of my bag with the Gripcase, the screen would not have cracked. Although I liked the Grabber case, I can't recommend it in terms of keeping your iPad safe. New Trent no longer manufactures this style of case, and sells an armored “Grabber” case for the iPad Air. I would consider that case if I owned an iPad Air, but I do not.

My hope for you is that you never have to deal with a broken screen–but it happens. If it happens and you are not under warranty (AppleCare covers repair for a period of time with a co-pay), you do have options. And your best bet may be a good case.

The Maglus Stylus (with microfiber tip)

I wrote and blogged a little about this the other day, but I wanted to follow up on this topic.

I am very pleased to announce that the makers of my favorite stylus, Applydea, has finally released a microfiber tip for the Maglus stylus. The Maglus came out some time ago, and I have blogged about it in the past. It is shaped like a drafting pencil, which allows you to hold it like a pencil or as a pen. It also has a magnet that allows you to attach the stylus to your iPad or Smart Cover, and it has an interchangeable tip.

I have actually owned two Maglus styluses in the past years. The first was a v. 1.0 release–the rubber tip eventually ripped, and the rubber sides fell off, releasing the magnets. I wrote the company and was given a discount to purchase the current generation Maglus, with the interchangeable tip. That stylus (and its rubber tip) are still going strong.

The problem–for me–was the rubber tip that comes with the Maglus. The rubber tip works, but once you have used a microfiber stylus, you don't want to go back to a rubber-tipped stylus ever again. I have been using the Boxwave Evertouch Capacitve Stylus (microfiber tip), the Wow 4-in-1 stylus (microfiber tip), or my Adonit Jot Pro (plastic disc tip) in the past months and have avoided all rubber-tipped styluses.

I had bothered the folks at Applydea for some time, requesting a microfiber tip, and I certianly won't take credit for their eventual release of that tip (others asked, too). But they did respond that one was in development, and lo and behold, it is now available. I love the fact that you can replace the tip–microfiber can wear out in time, and with other styluses, you simply have to throw them away.

How does it work? Just as you would expect. It works wonderfully for anything that you would use a stylus for. If you need ultra-precision, you will still want the Adonit Jot or a Bluetooth stylus (if you have an app that allows for that stylus), but for any other task, I really feel the Maglus is the best stylus on the market. Sadly, you have to buy a Maglus with the rubber tip and then the microfiber tip, and by the time you are done shopping, you will have invested $36 in the stylus and $10 in the tip. But you will undoubtedly be purchasing the best microfiber stylus on the market–with a better quality tip and more flexibility (think about the shape of the drafting pencil) than any other microfiber stylus. You can buy four or five Boxwave styluses for the price of one Maglus, but I really do believe the stylus is worth it. They also have a black stylus (I purchased one…all of my iOS devices are black) and a mini Maglus.

If you choose to buy a Maglus, I do have a rewards account for referrals, and you are invited to use this code to get a 10% discount, and I will earn a 10% referral bonus for your order (with which I will likely use to buy more products from Applydea). If you are so inclined, the referral website is http://maglusstylus.com/sh/xvy

I recommend the Maglus from the perspective of an owner who has bought three of them out of my own pocket –not with the hopes of making a million dollars from the affiliate link above.

 

Presentation from NCACDA: iPads and Choral Music

This past Saturday, I presented a session at the NCACDA Convention entitled, “iPads and Choral Music,” which I consider my introductory presentation to the use of the iPad in Choral Music.  In this presentation, I discuss some of the current models for 1:1 integration, a small bit of theory of technology integration, and ten ways to start (substitute/replace) using an iPad in choral music.  Also included in the presentation was a list of my top ten power apps, as well as my favorite accessories.  You can find a link to the presentation here: iPads in Choral Music.

New Stylus: The WOW 4 in 1 from Kmart

Last night, as I was in Ames, Iowa without my family, I had to run to the store to buy some things. As I previously mentioned in another post, my voice has been gone since Wednesday night, and I needed to get some things to help my voice (some sugar free Ricola lozenges, for example). The Kmart in Ames in very near the hotel, so it was my first stop. I was also looking for a multi-function USB cable, so that in the future I could travel without a lot of extra cables. I actually left a lot of equipment at home for this trip, and for the first time in nine months of use, my AirTurn foot pedal had no battery power, and I did not have a Mini-USB cable with me.

Well, I stopped at the Kmart electronics department and did not find the multi-function USB cable, but I did trip upon this stylus:

Screen Shot 2013-11-23 at 8.34.32 PM

 

I had purchased a wonderful handmade wooden stylus with a pen tip on one side, and a rubber stylus on the other two years ago, and the rubber tip had long developed a crack making the stylus part unusable. So I have been looking for a pen stylus, and this one interested me.

Most importantly, it has a fiber mesh tip. Although you can buy styluses with smaller tips (e.g. the Hand stylus) or a clear tip (the Adonit Jot), or Bluetooth Styluses, I have found that Fiber Mesh styluses give me the best experience on the iPad (granted, I have not tried Bluetooth styluses). I still thank Sarah Mayer for exposing me to fiber mesh styluses last year at TI:ME/TMEA.

At any rate, I like how the WOW 4 in 1 stylus works; it has a fiber mesh stylus cap that goes over the pen (which guarantees you won't write on your iPad), and the tip operates as well as any other fiber mesh stylus I have–although I have only been using it one day. It also has a laser pointer and a flashlight–something I'm not bound to use that often, but for a $11 stylus (it was a bit less expensive at Kmart), I'll take them as an added bonus.

So, if you need a stylus, you can purchase this one online (they also have other models of fiber mesh styluses by Wow), or visit your local Kmart. I worked at Kmart from 1989-2004, it is amazing how much the place has changed over the years.

As a side note, I did not find my desired USB cable at Kmart or even Best Buy, I found it at Walmart for $15. And there were no fiber mesh styluses available at Best Buy or Walmart (although Best Buy does sell the Wacom Bluetooth Stylus for $100).

 

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